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MBE 4000 SCHEDULED INTERVALS

When performed on a regular basis, changing the engine oil and filters is the least costly way of obtaining safe and reliable vehicle operation. Added benefits and savings occur when you check that the valves, fuel injectors, and oil and cooling circuits are in good working order during oil changes. ‪

The maintenance section of this manual explains when you should change your oil and what to look for when checking for wear or damage. ‪

All service intervals and maintenance operations are based on the parts and accessories expressly approved for your engine. ‪

The scope and frequency of maintenance work are determined by the engine's operating conditions: severe duty, short haul, or long haul. ‪

Evidence of regular maintenance is essential if a warranty claim has to be submitted. ‪

If optional equipment is installed, be sure to comply with the maintenance requirements for these extra items. ‪

Note: If the engine is stored for more than 18 months, the oil must be changed before the engine can be brought into service.

Maintenance Schedule Types

There are three types of maintenance schedule. To determine which schedule to use, find the distance traveled by the vehicle in a year, regardless of vehicle type. ‪

  • Schedule I (Severe Service)

    Severe Service applies to vehicles that annually travel up to 6000 miles (10,000 kilometers) or that operate under severe conditions. Examples of Severe Service usage include: operation on extremely poor roads or where there is heavy dust accumulation; constant exposure to extreme hot, cold, salt-air, or other extreme climates; frequent short-distance travel; construction-site operation; city operation (fire truck, garbage truck); or farm operation. ‪

  • Schedule II (Short Haul)

    Short Haul applies to vehicles that annually travel up to 60,000 miles (100,000 kilometers) and operate under normal conditions. Examples of Short-Haul usage are: operation primarily in cities and densely populated areas; local transport with infrequent freeway travel; or high percentage of stop-and-go travel. ‪

  • Schedule III (Long Haul)

    Long Haul (over-the-road transport) is for vehicles that annually travel more than 60,000 miles (100,000 kilometers), with minimal city or stop-and-go operation. Examples of Long-Haul usage are: regional delivery that is mostly freeway miles; interstate transport; or any road operation with high annual mileage. ‪

Maintenance Schedule and Interval Operations

The three different schedules of vehicle usage (severe, short haul, and long haul) are listed in Table . For each schedule, the appropriate distance interval (in miles and kilometers) is given for performing and repeating each maintenance operation. ‪

Maintenance Schedule ‪

Maintenance Interval Operation ‪

Maintenance Intervals ‪

Frequency ‪

Miles ‪

Km ‪

Schedule I (Severe Service) vehicles that annually travel up to 6000 miles (10 000 km) ‪

Maintenance 1 (M1) ‪

every ‪

10,000 ‪

17,000 ‪

Optional oil centrifuge (change rotor) ‪

every ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

Maintenance 2 (M2) ‪

every ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

Maintenance 3 (M3) ‪

first ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

then every ‪

40,000 ‪

68,000 ‪

Schedule II (Short Haul) vehicles that annually travel up to 60,000 miles (100 000 km) ‪

Maintenance 1 (M1) ‪

every ‪

15,000 ‪

25 000 ‪

Optional oil centrifuge (change rotor) ‪

every ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

Maintenance 2 (M2) ‪

every ‪

30,000 ‪

50,000 ‪

Maintenance 3 (M3) ‪

first ‪

30,000 ‪

50 000 ‪

then every ‪

60,000 ‪

100,000 ‪

Maintenance 4 (M4) ‪

every ‪

120,000 ‪

20,000 ‪

Schedule III (Long Haul)vehicles that annually travel more than 60,000 miles (100 000 km) ‪

Optional oil centrifuge (change rotor) ‪

every ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

Maintenance 1 (M1) ‪

every ‪

25,000 ‪

42,000 ‪

Maintenance 2 (M2) ‪

every ‪

50,000 ‪

84,000 ‪

Maintenance 3 (M3) ‪

first ‪

50,000 ‪

84,000 ‪

then every ‪

100,000 ‪

167,000 ‪

Maintenance 4 (M4) ‪

every ‪

200,000 ‪

334,000 ‪

Maintenance Schedule Table

The descriptions of all maintenance operations, indicating all maintenance operation sets at which each operation must be performed are listed in Table , listed in Table , listed in Table . ‪

These three maintenance interval tables show which maintenance operation must be performed at the actual distances (in miles or kilometers) for each maintenance operation. The schedule of actual distances is based on the intervals given in the Maintenance Schedule Table. ‪

Maint. No ‪

Maintenance Interval ‪

Miles ‪

Km ‪

1 ‪

M1 ‪

10,000 ‪

17,000 ‪

2 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

20,000 ‪

32,000 ‪

3 ‪

M1 ‪

30,000 ‪

50,000 ‪

4 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

40,000 ‪

67,000 ‪

5 ‪

M1 ‪

50,000 ‪

84, 000 ‪

6 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

60,000 ‪

100, 000 ‪

7 ‪

M1 ‪

70,000 ‪

117,000 ‪

8 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

80,000 ‪

134,000 ‪

9 ‪

M1 ‪

90,000 ‪

150,000 ‪

10 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

100,000 ‪

167,000 ‪

11 ‪

M1 ‪

110,000 ‪

184,000 ‪

12 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

120,000 ‪

200,000 ‪

13 ‪

M1 ‪

130,000 ‪

217,000 ‪

14 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

140,000 ‪

234,000 ‪

15 ‪

M1 ‪

150,000 ‪

250,000 ‪

16 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

160,000 ‪

267,000 ‪

Maintenance Intervals for Schedule I, Severe Service

Maint. No. ‪

Maintenance Interval ‪

Miles ‪

Km ‪

1 ‪

M1 ‪

15,000 ‪

25 000 ‪

2 ‪

M1 and M3 ‪

30,000 ‪

50,000 ‪

3 ‪

M1 ‪

45,000 ‪

75,000 ‪

4 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

60,000 ‪

100,000 ‪

5 ‪

M1 ‪

75,000 ‪

125,000 ‪

6 ‪

M1and M3 ‪

90,000 ‪

150,000 ‪

7 ‪

M1 ‪

105,000 ‪

120,000 ‪

8 ‪

M1, M2 and M4 ‪

120,000 ‪

200,000 ‪

9 ‪

M1 ‪

135,000 ‪

225,000 ‪

10 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

150,000 ‪

250,000 ‪

11 ‪

M1 ‪

165,000 ‪

275,000 ‪

12 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

180,000 ‪

300,000 ‪

13 ‪

M1 ‪

195,000 ‪

325,000 ‪

14 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

210,000 ‪

350,000 ‪

15 ‪

M1 ‪

225,000 ‪

375,000 ‪

16 ‪

M1, M2 and M4 ‪

240,000 ‪

400,000 ‪

Maintenance Intervals for Schedule II, Short Haul

Maint. No ‪

Maintenance Interval ‪

Miles ‪

Km ‪

1 ‪

M1 ‪

25,000 ‪

42,000 ‪

2 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

50,000 ‪

84,000 ‪

3 ‪

M1 ‪

75,000 ‪

125,000 ‪

4 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

100,000 ‪

167,000 ‪

5 ‪

M1 ‪

125,000 ‪

209,000 ‪

6 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

150,000 ‪

250 000 ‪

7 ‪

M1 ‪

175,000 ‪

292,000 ‪

8 ‪

M1, M2, and M4 ‪

200,000 ‪

334,000 ‪

9 ‪

M1 ‪

225,000 ‪

375,000 ‪

10 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

250,000 ‪

417,000 ‪

11 ‪

M1 ‪

275,000 ‪

459,000 ‪

12 ‪

M1 and M2 ‪

300,000 ‪

500,000 ‪

13 ‪

M1 ‪

325,000 ‪

542,000 ‪

14 ‪

M1, M2 and M3 ‪

350,000 ‪

584,000 ‪

15 ‪

M1 ‪

375,000 ‪

625,000 ‪

16 ‪

M1, M2, and M4 ‪

400,000 ‪

667,000 ‪

Maintenance Intervals for Schedule III, Long Haul
Maintenance Operation Sets

Each Maintenance Operations Sets Table (M1 through M3) lists the descriptions of only those maintenance operations that must be performed at that maintenance operation set. Each maintenance operation set is listed in a separate Maintenance Operations Table. ‪

The descriptions of all maintenance operations, and the maintenance operation sets at which each operation must be performed are listed in Table and listed in Table . ‪

Operation Description ‪

M1 ‪

M2 ‪

M3 ‪

Engine Inspecting ‪

Valve Lash Checking and Adjusting ‪

Fuel /Water Separator Pre-Filter Element Cleaning ‪

Main Fuel Filter Element Changing ‪

Engine Oil and Filter Changing ‪

Coolant Concentration and Inhibitor Level Checking ‪

Coolant Flushing and Changing* ‪

Cooling System Inspecting ‪

Required Maintenance Operations Sets, Schedule I

Maintenance Operation Description ‪

M1 ‪

M2 ‪

M3 ‪

M4 ‪

Engine Inspecting ‪

Valve Lash Checking and Adjusting ‪

Fuel /Water Sepator Pre-Filter Element Cleaning ‪

Main Fuel Filter Element Changing ‪

Engine Oil and Filter Changing ‪

Coolant Concentration and Inhibator Level Checking ‪

Coolant Flushing and Changing* ‪

Cooling System Inspecting ‪

Required Maintenance Operations Sets, Schedule II and III


Fuel/Water Separator Pre-Filter Element Cleaning

Clean the pre-filter element as follows: ‪

  1. Loosen the bleed screw. See Figure 42513 .

    1. Hand Pump ‪

    5. Pre-Filter Element ‪

    2. Separator Head ‪

    6. Sight Bowl ‪

    3. Bleed Screw ‪

    7. Drain Plug ‪

    4. O-ring ‪

    Fuel /Water Separator

  2. Unscrew the drain plug and drain the fuel in the pre-filter.
  3. Twist off the sight bowl and remove the filter element from the separator head.
  4. Separate the sight bowl from the filter element. Clean the sight bowl. Discard the old filter element and both O-rings.
  5. Replace the filter element and O-rings.
  6. Assemble the sight bowl and the pre-filter element.
    1. Lubricate one O-ring with a light coating of engine oil.
    2. Insert the lubricated O-ring into the sight bowl.
    3. Screw the pre-filter element and sight bowl together.
  7. Assemble the pre-filter element and the separator head.
    1. Lubricate the other O-ring with a light coating of engine oil.
    2. Insert the lubricated O-ring into the open end of the pre-filter element.
    3. Screw the pre-filter element onto the separator head and tighten firmly, using hands only.
    4. Note: Do not use tools to tighten the pre-filter element.

  8. Insert the filter element into the pre-filter housing and screw the cap onto the housing. Tighten the cap 25 Nm (18 lbft).
  9. Tighten the drain plug.
  10. Bleed the fuel system.
    1. Make sure that all high-pressure lines have been tightened to 25 Nm (18 lbft) and all banjo bolts to 50 Nm (37 lbft).

      NOTICE:

      Correct torque on the high pressure lines is critical. Incorrect torques could result in leaks or lack of power due to restricted fuel flow. ‪

    2. If equipped with a hand pump on the fuel/water separator, work the hand pump 50 times.

      Note: There should be a strong resistance in the hand pump, caused by the pressure build-up within the fuel system.

      PERSONAL INJURY

      Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.

      • Always start and operate an engine in a well ventilated area.
      • If operating an engine in an enclosed area, vent the exhaust to the outside.
      • Do not modify or tamper with the exhaust system or emission control system.
    3. Crank the engine for 30 seconds at a time, but no longer. Before cranking the engine again, wait at least two minutes. The engine should start within four 30 second attempts.

Main Fuel Filter Element Changing

Change the main fuel filter element as follows: ‪

  1. Open the fuel filler cap to release pressure in the fuel system. Replace and tighten the cap.
  2. Clean the outside of the fuel filter housing. See Figure 42514 .

    1. Filter Housing Cap ‪

    3. Filter Element ‪

    2. O-ring ‪

    Main Fuel Filter

  3. Using a 36-mm socket wrench insert, unscrew the cap on the fuel filter and remove it, along with the filter element. Pull both the cap and the filter element a short distance out of the filter housing. Allow the fuel to drain off the filter into the housing.
  4. Remove the cap with the filter element. To release the filter element, twist the lower edge of the filter element to one side.

    NOTICE:

    To prevent damage to the filter housing, do not allow dirt to get into the filter housing. ‪

  5. Clean the filter housing cap.
  6. Replace the O-ring.
  7. Install the new filter element in the cap. Make sure the filter element is securely in place.
  8. Screw on the cap with the filter element. Tighten the cap 25 Nm (18 lbft).
  9. Bleed the fuel system.
    1. Make sure that all high-pressure lines have been tightened to 25 Nm (18 lbft) and all banjo bolts to 50 Nm (37 lbft).

      NOTICE:

      Correct torque on the high pressure lines is critical. Incorrect torques could result in leaks or lack of power due to restricted fuel flow. ‪

    2. If equipped with a hand pump on the fuel/water separator, work the hand pump 50 times.

      Note: There should be a strong resistance in the hand pump, caused by the pressure build-up within the fuel system.

      PERSONAL INJURY

      Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.

      • Always start and operate an engine in a well ventilated area.
      • If operating an engine in an enclosed area, vent the exhaust to the outside.
      • Do not modify or tamper with the exhaust system or emission control system.
    3. Crank the engine for 30 seconds at a time, but no longer. Wait at least two minutes, then crank again. The engine should start within four 30-second attempts.
  10. Start the engine. Check the fuel filter housing for leaks.

Engine Oil and Filter Changing

Select the SAE class (viscosity) on the basis of the average air temperature for the season. See Figure 42442 . ‪

Note: Too strict adherence to the SAE classes will result in frequent oil changes. For this reason, view the temperature ranges for the various SAE classes as guidelines that can be exceeded for a short time.

Engine Oil Temperature Ranges

Use approved multigrade oils to extend the temperature range. ‪

To ensure the engine is protected and the oil stays clean until the next oil change, use only oils of API classification CH4. ‪

Drain oil as follows: ‪

PERSONAL INJURY

To avoid injury before starting and running the engine, ensure the vehicle is parked on a level surface, parking brake is set, and the wheels are blocked.

  1. Chock the tires, place the transmission in neutral, and set the parking brake.

    Note: Change the engine oil only when the engine is at a temperature of approximately 140F (60C).

  2. Using a 36-mm socket, unscrew the oil filter cap. See Figure 42515 .

    Oil Filter Cap

    FIRE

    To avoid injury from fire, keep open flames, sparks, electrical resistance heating elements, or other potential ignition sources away when draining lubrication oil. Do not smoke when draining lubricating oil.

  3. Drain the oil.
    1. Place a suitable receptacle beneath the oil drain plug on the underside of the oil pan.
    2. Carefully unscrew the oil drain plug on the oil pan and allow the oil to drain out.
    3. Discard the O-ring on the oil drain plug.

      Engine Oil Drain Plug

  4. Remove both the filter cap and the filter element. To release the filter element, twist the lower edge of the filter element to the side. See Figure 42155 .

    1. Cap ‪

    3. Filter Element ‪

    2. O-ring ‪

    Cap with Oil Filter Element

    NOTICE:

    To prevent damage to the filter housing, ensure that no foreign objects get inside it. Do not wipe clean the filter housing. ‪

  5. Replace the O-ring on the cap. See Figure 42155 .
  6. Install the new filter into the cap. Make sure the filter element is securely in place.
  7. Screw the cap onto the oil filter housing. Tighten the cap 45 Nm (33 lbft).
  8. Install the oil drain plug, using a new O-ring. Tighten the plug 80 Nm (60 lbft).
  9. Add new engine oil through the oil fill, see Figure 42503 , until the maximum fill level on the oil dipstick has been reached. Engine fill capacity is 44.4 qts (42.0 L).

    1. Oil Dipstick ‪

    2. Oil Fill Cap ‪

    Oil Fill

    PERSONAL INJURY

    Diesel engine exhaust and some of its constituents are known to the State of California to cause cancer, birth defects, and other reproductive harm.

    • Always start and operate an engine in a well ventilated area.
    • If operating an engine in an enclosed area, vent the exhaust to the outside.
    • Do not modify or tamper with the exhaust system or emission control system.
  10. Start the engine with the accelerator pedal in the idle position. Monitor the oil pressure gauge.

    NOTICE:

    Keep the engine running at idling speed until an oil pressure reading is obtained. If no oil pressure is shown after approximately 10 seconds, stop the engine and determine the cause. Failure to do so could result in engine damage. ‪

  11. Check the filter and oil drain plug for signs of leakage.
  12. Stop the engine. Check the oil level again after approximately five minutes. If necessary, add oil up to the maximum fill level on the oil dipstick.

Coolant Concentration and Inhibitor Level Checking

Check the coolant concentration as follows: ‪

HOT COOLANT

To avoid scalding from the expulsion of hot coolant, never remove the cooling system pressure cap while the engine is at operating temperature. Wear adequate protective clothing (face shield, rubber gloves, apron, and boots). Remove the cap slowly to relieve pressure.

Note: Check and correct the coolant level only when the coolant temperature is below 122F (50C).

  1. Open the cap on the surge tank slowly, to allow excess pressure to escape. Set the cap aside.
  2. Before adding coolant, use a suitable tester to check the concentration of corrosion-inhibiting antifreeze. If the concentration is lower than 50 percent by volume, drain coolant/add antifreeze until the concentration is correct. The coolant mixing ratio is listed in Table .

    Antifreeze Protection Down to F (C) ‪

    Water Percentage by Volume ‪

    Corrosion-Inhibiting Antifreeze Percentage by Volume ‪

    34 (37) ‪

    50 ‪

    50 ‪

    62 (52) ‪

    40 ‪

    Maximum 60* ‪

    Coolant Mixing Ratio

    Note: When topping off, use only a pre-prepared coolant mixture containing a 50 percent concentration by volume of corrosion-inhibiting antifreeze.

    NOTICE:

    If the concentration of antifreeze is too low, there is a risk of corrosion or cavitation in the cooling system. ‪

  3. Check the coolant level and add more coolant if necessary.

Coolant Inhibitor Test Intervals

Coolant inhibitor level should be checked at the intervals listed in Table . ‪

If topping off is needed, add coolant which is identical to the initial fill coolant. ‪

Check the nitrite concentration at regular intervals as listed in Table with a Power Trac 3Way Test Strip. Nitrite levels must be within 8002400 PPM. Additional SCA must be added to the coolant when it becomes depleted, as indicated by a nitrite concentration of 800 PPM or less. If the nitrite concentration is greater than 800 PPM, do not add additional SCA. If the nitrite concentration is above 2400 PPM, the system is over-inhibited and should be partially drained and filled with a 50/50 mix of water and EG or PG. ‪

Note: Drain intervals listed in Table are dependent on proper maintenance.

Service Application ‪

Inhibitor Test Interval ‪

On-highway Trucks and Motor Coaches ‪

20,000 Miles (32,000 Kilometers ‪

City Transit Coaches, Pick-up and Delivery Short Trip, and Emergency Vehicles ‪

6,00 Miles (9,600 Kilometers) or three months, whichever comes first ‪

Industrial, Continuous Duty Generator Set, and all Other Applications ‪

500 Hours or three months, whichever comes first ‪

Stand-by Generator Set ‪

200 Hours or yearly, whichever comes first ‪

Required Coolant Inhibitor Test Intervals

Coolant ‪

Maintenance Interval ‪

Action ‪

Antifreeze/Water + SCA Inhibitor (DDC Power Cool) ‪

A. 20,000 miles (32,000 km) ‪

or 3 months ‪

B. 500 hours or 3 months ‪

Test nitrite concentration with test strip. Add SCA or dilute coolant as needed. ‪

A. 30,000 miles (480,000 km) ‪

B. 2 years or 4,000 hours ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

Ethylene Glycol/Water + SCA Inhibitor ‪

A. 20,000 miles (32,000 km) ‪

or 3 months ‪

B. 500 hours or 3 months ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

A. 300,000 miles (480,000 km) ‪

B. 2 years or 4,000 hours ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

Ethylene Glycol/Water + NOAT Inhibitor ‪

A. 300,000 miles (480,000 km) ‪

or 2 years ‪

B. 5,000 hours ‪

Add Power Cool Plus Extender ‪

A.600,000 miles (960,000 km) ‪

B. 4 years or 10,000 hours ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

Water Only + SCA Inhibitor ‪

A. 20,000 miles (32,000 km) ‪

or 3 months ‪

B. 500 hours or 3 months ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

A. 3000,000 miles (480,000 km) ‪

B. 2 years or 4,000 hours ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

Water Only + NOAT Inhibitor ‪

A. 3000,000 miles (480,000 km) ‪

or 2 years ‪

B. 5,000 hours ‪

Add Power Cool Plus Extender ‪

A. 6000,000 miles (960,000 km) ‪

B. 4 years or 10,000 hours ‪

Drain and clean system. Replace with new coolant. ‪

Nitrite Interval Checks


Inhibitor Level Checking

Use Detroit Diesel PowerTrac 3way Coolant Test Strips to measure nitrite and glycol concentrations. Cavitation/corrosion protection is indicated on the strip by the level of nitrite concentration. Freeze/boil-over protection is determined by glycol concentration. ‪

Check the inhibitor level as follows: ‪

HOT COOLANT

To avoid scalding from the expulsion of hot coolant, never remove the cooling system pressure cap while the engine is at operating temperature. Wear adequate protective clothing (face shield, rubber gloves, apron, and boots). Remove the cap slowly to relieve pressure.

  1. Dip the test strip into the coolant for one second, then remove it. Shake the strip vigorously to remove excess liquid.
  2. Immediately compare the end pad to the color chart on the container to determine the glycol concentration.
  3. Sixty seconds (one minute) after dipping, compare the nitrite pad to the color chart on the container to determine the nitrite concentration.
  4. If the additive indicator (middle pad) shows any color change, this indicates the presence of an unauthorized inhibitor.
  5. If any problems exist, change the coolant.
  6. After each use, replace and tighten the cap on the test strip container. Discard any test strips that have turned light pink or tan in color.
  7. Close and tighten the cap on the surge tank.

Coolant Flushing and Changing

Flush and change the coolant as follows: ‪

HOT COOLANT

To avoid scalding from the expulsion of hot coolant, never remove the cooling system pressure cap while the engine is at operating temperature. Wear adequate protective clothing (face shield, rubber gloves, apron, and boots). Remove the cap slowly to relieve pressure.

  1. Open the cap on the surge tank slowly, to allow excess pressure to escape. Set the cap aside.
  2. Open the water regulating valve for the heating system.
  3. Drain the coolant from the engine. See Figure 42516 . The coolant system capacity is listed in Table .

    Coolant Drain Plug

    System ‪

    Description ‪

    Capacity ‪

    Quarts (Liters) ‪

    Engine Coolant Capacity (all vehicles) ‪

    Engine capacity* ‪

    31.7 (30.0) ‪

    Century Class and Columbia Cooling System Capacity ‪

    Total capacity ‪

    60.7 (57.4) ‪

    Antifreeze quantity at 50% ‪

    60.7 (57.4) ‪

    Antifreeze quantity at 60% ‪

    36.4 (34.4) ‪